Famous baseball players on steroids

Compared with the present, professional baseball in the early 20th century was lower-scoring, and pitchers, including stars Walter Johnson and Christy Mathewson , were more dominant. The " inside game ", which demanded that players "scratch for runs", was played much more aggressively than it is today: the brilliant and often violent Ty Cobb epitomized this style. [42] The so-called dead-ball era ended in the early 1920s with several changes in rule and circumstance that were advantageous to hitters. Strict new regulations governing the ball's size, shape and composition, along with a new rule officially banning the spitball and other pitches that depended on the ball being treated or roughed-up with foreign substances, followed the death of Ray Chapman after a pitch struck him in the head in August 1920. Coupled with superior materials available after World War I, this resulted in a ball that traveled farther when hit. The construction of additional seating to accommodate the rising popularity of the game often had the effect of reducing the distance to the outfield fences, making home runs more common. [43] The rise of the legendary player Babe Ruth , the first great power hitter of the new era, helped permanently alter the nature of the game. The club with which Ruth set most of his slugging records, the New York Yankees , built a reputation as the majors' premier team. [44] In the late 1920s and early 1930s, St. Louis Cardinals general manager Branch Rickey invested in several minor league clubs and developed the first modern " farm system ". [45] A new Negro National League was organized in 1933; four years later, it was joined by the Negro American League . The first elections to the National Baseball Hall of Fame took place in 1936. In 1939 Little League Baseball was founded in Pennsylvania. By the late 1940s, it was the organizing body for children's baseball leagues across the United States. [46]

Limited to just 17 games in 2013 due to a lingering ankle injury, Jeter announced he would be retiring after the 2014 season, his 20th in the majors. Although his numbers were well below his usual lofty standards, "The Captain" proved he could still rise to the occasion for big moments. He started a rally for the American League with a leadoff double in the All-Star Game, and knocked home the game-winning run in his final at-bat at Yankee Stadium in September. In addition to his five world championships, Jeter finished with an impressive .310 lifetime batting average, and his 3,465 hits ranked sixth in big league history.

Following a brief pregame ceremony on August 12, Rodriguez donned the Yankee pinstripes for one final time as a player, contributing an RBI double in the first inning to help his team win. While he never reached the record-shattering heights that once seemed attainable, the slugger still finished with numbers that rank among the best ever in several categories, including home runs (696), RBIs (2,086), hits (3,115) and runs (2,021). Along with his three MVP awards, he won two Gold Gloves for his fielding prowess and was selected for 14 All-Star Games.

Famous baseball players on steroids

famous baseball players on steroids


famous baseball players on steroidsfamous baseball players on steroidsfamous baseball players on steroidsfamous baseball players on steroidsfamous baseball players on steroids