Should athletes who use steroids be allowed in the hall of fame

The . states clearly that athletes are to be like any other student. Yet the association involves the athlete in such a heavily commercialized, multibillion dollar endeavor, that it ends up restricting the athlete from any college benefit beyond a scholarship. No other person within a university community is so restricted. Amateurism provides no benefit to the athlete, neither enhancing his education nor making him a better person. The Olympics began taking amateurism out of its charter in the 1970s, yet the . holds onto it as a cherished ideal. Money is not the problem in college sports. The problem is that the athlete is restricted from making any.

It is not immoral for the . to make money off of athletics. But it is profoundly immoral for the . to restrict athletes from receiving compensation while everyone else profits. Athletes do not need to be paid by the university as employees. But barriers to athlete compensation outside of the university should be removed. There is a lot of area in between strict amateurism and “pay for play.” Athletes should be allowed to operate freely in that area, just like every other student.


Research suggests that people who respond to intrinsic motives are more committed, enjoy their activities more, and are more persistent when they confront failure (Agbor-Baiyee, 1997). While this research examined student behavior, research examining athletes found similar results (Vallerand & Losier, 1999). Close to intrinsic motivation is a concept called interest (Wigfield, Eccles, & Rodriguez, 1998). People who engage in activities simply for the fact that they like doing it and expect no external reward can be said to have an interest in that activity. A primary objective for all coaches should be to encourage athletes to develop a genuine interest in their sport.

Where to start… Youth (?) not! Your talking old school maybe junior/ senior in high school workouts using what sounds like old school free wts.. Youth don’t have the strength due to many factors and should be focusing on neuromuscular patterns. They don’t get the strength gains your emphasing until usually 16-17+ when muscle strength and hypertrophy can kick in and it sounds like your talking single plane and axis of movement patterns. Multi plane/ axis movement and activities along with deceleration to acceleration sequencing for overall multi sports are what ‘s neede for youth. With youth it’s the neural system that is the key as strength is extremely limited due to bodies not ready for the strength you’re talking about here.

But scientists say there is no physiological evidence to suggest that sex before competition is bad. In fact, some studies suggest that pre-sports sex may actually aid athletes by raising their testosterone levels, for example. It is unclear, however, what psychological effects sex may have on an athlete's performance. Some scientists suggest that abstinence could help some athletes concentrate better. "There are two possible ways sex before competition could affect performance," said Ian Shrier, a sports medicine specialist at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. "First, it could make you tired and weak the next day," Shrier said. "This has been disproved. "The second way is that it could affect your psychological state of mind. This has not been tested," he said. Power Sports In 2000 Shrier published an editorial titled "Does Sex the Night Before Competition Decrease Performance?" in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine. He wrote that the "long-standing myth that athletes should practice abstinence before important competitions may stem from the theory that sexual frustration leads to increased aggression." The abstinence tradition is particularly strong in power sports, such as boxing and football, in which aggression is considered a valuable trait. Some people believe the act of ejaculation draws testosterone, the hormone of both sexual desire and aggression, from the body. "This is a really wrong idea," said Emmanuele A. Jannini of the University of L'Aquila in Italy. Jannini is a professor of endocrinology, the study of bodily secretions, and has studied effects of sex on athletic performance. Continued on Next Page >>

LATEST NEWS VIDEOS Stuck Mars Rover About to Die? Giant Salamanders Helped to Spawn Rare Gorillas Spied Feasting on Figs More Videos in the News SOURCES AND RELATED WEB SITES

  • Barry Komisaruk, Rutgers University
  • University of L'Aquila
  • McGill University
Latest Photo News SPACE PHOTOS THIS WEEK: Tiny Galaxy, Sun's Iron, More

Should athletes who use steroids be allowed in the hall of fame

should athletes who use steroids be allowed in the hall of fame

But scientists say there is no physiological evidence to suggest that sex before competition is bad. In fact, some studies suggest that pre-sports sex may actually aid athletes by raising their testosterone levels, for example. It is unclear, however, what psychological effects sex may have on an athlete's performance. Some scientists suggest that abstinence could help some athletes concentrate better. "There are two possible ways sex before competition could affect performance," said Ian Shrier, a sports medicine specialist at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. "First, it could make you tired and weak the next day," Shrier said. "This has been disproved. "The second way is that it could affect your psychological state of mind. This has not been tested," he said. Power Sports In 2000 Shrier published an editorial titled "Does Sex the Night Before Competition Decrease Performance?" in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine. He wrote that the "long-standing myth that athletes should practice abstinence before important competitions may stem from the theory that sexual frustration leads to increased aggression." The abstinence tradition is particularly strong in power sports, such as boxing and football, in which aggression is considered a valuable trait. Some people believe the act of ejaculation draws testosterone, the hormone of both sexual desire and aggression, from the body. "This is a really wrong idea," said Emmanuele A. Jannini of the University of L'Aquila in Italy. Jannini is a professor of endocrinology, the study of bodily secretions, and has studied effects of sex on athletic performance. Continued on Next Page >>

LATEST NEWS VIDEOS Stuck Mars Rover About to Die? Giant Salamanders Helped to Spawn Rare Gorillas Spied Feasting on Figs More Videos in the News SOURCES AND RELATED WEB SITES

  • Barry Komisaruk, Rutgers University
  • University of L'Aquila
  • McGill University
Latest Photo News SPACE PHOTOS THIS WEEK: Tiny Galaxy, Sun's Iron, More

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